One "last" project - a tele partscaster

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Comments

  • nicholaspaulnicholaspaul Posts: 520Member
    Wow that's an amazing job you've done of that. Nobody would know! I'm so glad it was a relatively simple fix. That is a lovely looking neck!
  • MegiMegi Posts: 6,748Member

    Wow that's an amazing job you've done of that. Nobody would know! I'm so glad it was a relatively simple fix. That is a lovely looking neck!

    Thanks Nick - I am pleased myself I admit, and it's nice to be able to rescue what is undeniably a nice neck otherwise. OK, the factory shouldn't have made it with the issue in the first place, I shouldn't have had to faff about like this (especially considering it was by no means the cheapest neck I could have gone for) but it's better to make things like this work than have them condemned to the scrap heap I feel. :)

  • LesterLester Posts: 1,505Member, Moderator
    I agree, that neck looks worth keeping if the faults can be worked around. Your patience to sand out the hole is a sign of great workmanship. Well done!
  • Mark PMark P Posts: 2,207Member
    Very nice job with the truss rod hole Graham - up to your usual high standards and done with your enviable patience! :smile:

    Those photos really highlight the poor QC! But I guess even the best people / organisations have their bad days and mistakes are just a normal human "quality".
  • nicholaspaulnicholaspaul Posts: 520Member
    Mark P said:

    Very nice job with the truss rod hole Graham - up to your usual high standards and done with your enviable patience! :smile:

    Those photos really highlight the poor QC! But I guess even the best people / organisations have their bad days and mistakes are just a normal human "quality".

    Patience? I'll say! 240 grit is not exactly course! I'd have grabbed a drill and made more work for myself when I slipped. Doh.

    Considering you can spend 2-3 times what northwest charge on something similar, I think you have to expect some discrepancies. Now, not being able to adjust the truss rod is a pretty big issue, but thankfully this was fixable. Well done for fixing not nixing! (Could that be a catchphrase?!)
  • MegiMegi Posts: 6,748Member
    Thanks chaps, appreciate your kind words - it's only a small job I know, but I like to think it's going the extra inch with these sort of details that makes the difference in the end. The QC isn't really all that bad Mark - I just think maybe the factory needs to have a bit of a talk with the bloke who cut the truss rod holes! :D I've said before that factory-produced stuff can be a strange mixture of high quality and daft unnecessary slip ups that spoil the ship for a ha'porth of tar - I've seen this quite a few times when working on my own and friend's guitars. Or maybe it was a Friday afternoon or something...

    I guess perhaps you're right about the pricing Nick - there certainly are more costly necks out there it's true. I guess I was thinking a bit about that Kmise neck you have for your build, and thinking I could have gone for one of those for a lot less. And also I paid about £90 for the one-piece maple Mighty Mite neck on my walnut strat, and that was/is absolutely issue free. But there certainly are very nice things in favour of this Northwest Guitars neck, and to be fair they would have been happy to exchange necks until I was happy, or refund without question at any point, so there is nowt wrong with their customer service.

    Re the sandpaper grit, I just happened to have some 250 grit to hand, so that's what I used. Could have gone to get some coarser stuff, but it seemed to be working, even if it took a while, so I just stuck with it. Too lazy to get up and walk to the garage basically!
  • Mark PMark P Posts: 2,207Member
    I just checked and it was £75 back in 2010 for the maple skunked strat neck I got from AxesRUs, but as I recall it was a cosmetically not perfect item and so was at a discount.
    I also recall I could not find or see anything that looked wrong!

    They had some real bargains on the go back then.
  • MegiMegi Posts: 6,748Member
    Mark P said:

    I just checked and it was £75 back in 2010 for the maple skunked strat neck I got from AxesRUs, but as I recall it was a cosmetically not perfect item and so was at a discount.
    I also recall I could not find or see anything that looked wrong!

    They had some real bargains on the go back then.

    So true! bargains indeed, we were living in times of luxury for the partscaster builder, if only we'd known it. I should have just bought a couple more necks from them when I had the chance, but of course that's with hindsight. Prices have gone up, and there are fewer options now as well.

    I notice Guitarbuild now has a neck building service where you can specify a lot of the options, and judging by the reviews, the necks are very nice. But I think most places don't do shall we say "F" style headstocks any more, and instead offer the paddle type you can cut to preference, which is OK, but if you're buying a finished neck, not ideal. Anyhow, I don't suppose I'll be doing a lot more of this parts building stuff, and I'm pleased I managed to get a few good ones done during the "golden era" :D
  • nicholaspaulnicholaspaul Posts: 520Member
    Axesrus have moved the production of their pickups inhouse so they are truly hand wound (in the sense that a person looks over the machine... which is about as hand wound as any pickup truly gets. You'd have to be a sadist to wind copper wire the thickness of your hair 8000 times around a bobbin with just your hands...). That would account for rising prices in the pickup department but I don't know about the other products.

    The benefit of being old(er) is that we can now look back on the good old days and whine like our parents did (and still do, to my chagrin!).
  • MegiMegi Posts: 6,748Member

    Axesrus have moved the production of their pickups inhouse so they are truly hand wound (in the sense that a person looks over the machine... which is about as hand wound as any pickup truly gets. You'd have to be a sadist to wind copper wire the thickness of your hair 8000 times around a bobbin with just your hands...). That would account for rising prices in the pickup department but I don't know about the other products.

    The benefit of being old(er) is that we can now look back on the good old days and whine like our parents did (and still do, to my chagrin!).

    I think there is at least one US pickup winder that does offer actual hand wound pickups i.e. no motor-driven winder, although perhaps they use some sort of mechanical winding device. The claim is that by winding the pickup very slow, they can really make sure the coils are well scattered, and have that extra control over the whole thing. More treble frequencies they say, though whether that's a good thing is open for debate.

    I'm an Axesrus fan, and I do perfectly understand their move to in-house pickup manufacture, and the reasons for it. The necks I did buy from them are brilliant as well, a shame they had to stop, but again, I understand why.

    Re the "golden age", things were better in mah day talk, I was being a tad tongue in cheek, as I'm sure you realise Nick. Although what you say about that is very true! :D
  • nicholaspaulnicholaspaul Posts: 520Member
    I'd like to see that 'hand operation' on action. Slow sounds expensive!

    Yea, I'm a big Axesrus fan too. They make great stuff and Craig is a top notch guy :) (hope he's listening!!!)

    Oh in my day, we had to walk 12 miles up hill both ways to the music shop to spend an entire hour's wage on a pack of strings! And you still had to buy VALVES for your amp. None of this digital mumbo jumbo... Hmph..Don't know they're born today...
    ;-)
  • MegiMegi Posts: 6,748Member
    You were lucky, we 'ad to make our own strings by grinding down bits of scrap metal with our fingernails. And then we'd come 'ome and our dad would cut us in half with a breadknife...
  • nicholaspaulnicholaspaul Posts: 520Member
    You had a breadknife? LUXURY! My dad had to fashion a breadknife out of a rusty old shovel using his teeth.
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