Chuck Berry RIP

Kevin PeatKevin Peat Posts: 2,892Member


A Lincolnshire events promoter recounted a story about Chuck Berry to a group I was with.

"I'd booked Chuck for a gig, not really knowing anything about him. On the night this black guy turns up last minute with guitar in hand and introduces himself. He says 'You got a band for me ?' luckily I had. Then he says '... got an amp ???' "

They really don't make 'em like that anymore.

Comments

  • Richards GuitarsRichards Guitars Posts: 588Member, Administrator
    One of the most influential rock & rollers of all time. RIP
  • The23rdmanThe23rdman Posts: 1,560Member
    Another genius leaves for the great gig in the sky.
  • nicholaspaulnicholaspaul Posts: 718Member
    Haha that's a great story Kevin!

    Radio 6 were playing all Chuck covers tonight. Bowie recorded 'Almost Grown' for John Peel Sessions - great tune and great cover.

    Just think of all those Chuck Berry licks you learned to play during your early days without even knowing they were his!
  • The23rdmanThe23rdman Posts: 1,560Member
    Time to leave this here.

    imagehttps://youtu.be/L-Ds-FXGGQg
  • Screaming DaveScreaming Dave Posts: 764Member
    Wow! Richard Ayoade on sax!
  • Kevin PeatKevin Peat Posts: 2,892Member
    No wonder a Springsteen gig takes 4 hours !
  • Screaming DaveScreaming Dave Posts: 764Member
    You'd have thought they'd rehearse before getting on stage, really
  • nicholaspaulnicholaspaul Posts: 718Member

    Wow! Richard Ayoade on sax!

    Now that would get me to a Boss gig!
  • Screaming DaveScreaming Dave Posts: 764Member
    edited March 24
    Yeah, if the cast of the IT Crowd made up the brass section!

    (Sorry, I must stop sniffing this Ajax)
  • nicholaspaulnicholaspaul Posts: 718Member

    Yeah, if the cast of the IT Crowd made up the brass section!

    (Sorry, I must stop sniffing this Ajax)

    I'd even go to a Britney gig to see that!!
  • SilversharkSilvershark Posts: 26Member
    Watching that Springsteen video I just realised that his lead guitarist with the bandana is also the main character in the Netfix TV series Lilyhammer.
  • nicholaspaulnicholaspaul Posts: 718Member
    edited April 5
    He is. I knew him the other way around. I thought it funny that the guy who played with Springsteen is now acting! I think he was in Sopranos too.
  • Screaming DaveScreaming Dave Posts: 764Member
    Yeah, it's Steve Van Zandt, isn't it?
  • nicholaspaulnicholaspaul Posts: 718Member

    Yeah, it's Steve Van Zandt, isn't it?

    Yup that's the chap.
  • Screaming DaveScreaming Dave Posts: 764Member
    Why is it that talented people seem to have it in bucketloads and turn their hands to all sorts of things, eh? IT'S NOT FAIR!!!!
  • Kevin PeatKevin Peat Posts: 2,892Member
    Dave - I've often noticed this. The fact is that one talent will often overlap another. Sports stars often win celebrity dance-offs and thespians become great chefs. It's the wiring that is right in the first place, the field in which to demonstrate it is incidental.

    I do not believe that it's (just) hard work that wins (We all work hard) but it's that the wiring must be right and the face must fit. A lot of it is to do with others wanting a person to win too and likeability has the effect of generating the belief, praise and inclusion among influential peers which is needed to keep a person dedicated and enthusiastic.

  • Kevin PeatKevin Peat Posts: 2,892Member
    edited April 7
    A friend of mine was in the SAS. He was also a top blogger. I cited the fact that he was a top blogger as evidence that he was in the SAS.

    A) He did not brag about either and I knew the latter for a fact.

    B ) He had no reason to lie to me or impress me. The latter was impressive enough.

    But

    C) I know that the chief quality of an SAS trooper is not the body but the mind and this particular blogger had the tenacity and intelligence to reach the top of one field, so why not another ?

    My other mate just couldn't get my reasoning. "Just 'cause he can write, doesn't mean he can fight !"
  • Screaming DaveScreaming Dave Posts: 764Member
    You're right, it's the will to succeed, coupled with a natural talent. The SAS man is a great example. As you say, being in the SAS is not about being a hard man. A lot if it is about having the mental resilience to keep going when things get tough, or even seem hopeless. What was it Winston Churchill said? "When you're going through Hell, keep going!" That same mental resilience applies to sportsmen and women, to keep going and battling, even in the face of what looks like certain defeat. It applies to all people in the arts, who keep on doing what they do, and knocking on doors, and just battling on until they get noticed.

    I guess they flip side is all those people who keep on battling on in the face of woefully inadequate skills and talent, believing they'll get noticed and get their break, even in the face of overwhelming evidence to the contrary. Like all the poor deluded fools on X-Factor ....

    ... and ... er ...

    Me
  • Kevin PeatKevin Peat Posts: 2,892Member
    Ha ha.

    Also the SAS man was able to think laterally and brass his way through tough times.

    I was putting some more thought to Steve Vand Zandt. And The Boss.

    The (sad) fact is that neither are good musicians. Their faces just fit the role. They are stereotyped to success. They win because they imbue in others the collective will to want them to win.

    So too with many so called multi-talented people. At the root of it is the permission the public have granted them to be 'talented'. Unless it's sporting glory or maths (sometimes teams carry less talented people) where achievements are undoubtable because of their quantifiable worth (goals scored or equations solved) the rest is subjective and decided by herd.

    I'm as guilty as anyone for participating in this btw.

  • Screaming DaveScreaming Dave Posts: 764Member
    I know it's an unpopular view, but I've never been a Springsteen fan. I kind of like him, meaning I like the pure rock 'n' roll image and the swagger, but I don't like his music all that much. So I guess that dovetails entirely with what you're saying. People like the image, so they make themselves like the music.

    I have a theory on this. I think women are far more swayed by the image of an artist than men are. Now, this is only a small sample, but I don't care what an artist looks like. KT Tunstall could be unatractive in the extreme (in fact she might be, I don't really know what she looks like), but I'd still love her music. Her music is her beauty, and the same goes for everyone else. My wife on the other hand seems to be very much influenced by looks. We only have to see some good looking bloke providing the music on, say, The Graham Norton Show, and my good lady will comment on how pleasing on the eye he is, and his CD will appear in our house a few days later ....

    ... well, I used to think this. But then, I was kind of interested in James Bay's music, but I wasn't convinced. I kind of thought there had to be more than just a big black hat to sustain a career. The I saw him on TFI Friday playing a 60s SG Junior, and I downloaded the album next day. So I'm as shallow as she is, just in a different way.
  • Kevin PeatKevin Peat Posts: 2,892Member
    Ha ha.

    My wife's a Jackanory fan all of a sudden. (Since Tom Hardy did it.)

    But how does your theory explain... THE ROLLING STONES !

    What a bunch of bug-ugly mo-fos.
  • Screaming DaveScreaming Dave Posts: 764Member
    Guys buy the music, so they don't care what they look like. I don't know for sure,but I would bet the farm that the demographic of buyers of all the really big name rock band are males. That's my theory
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