Alternative news site to the BBC - suggestions please!

MegiMegi Posts: 6,774Member
I know I've disagreed in the past with some forum members about the BBC's news reporting. However, of late I have to admit I'm finding their website in particular, to be rather shallow, and not showing the priorities I think it should. For example, the lead news story at the moment is that Mary Berry will be leaving Bake Off - tragic I'm sure you'll agree, but not really of any importance to me. It's a problem I've felt for a while, and I fear is getting worse.

But I do like to keep up with current events, both world and UK, and I like to follow the various political goings-on, plus I welcome a bit of insightful analysis, and intelligent comment and opinion. Can anyone recommend any altenative places to go to on the web? Cheers!

Comments

  • LesterLester Posts: 1,513Member, Moderator
    The BBC is an entertainment company. You may find using the web site of a company whose main service or product is news will give you more news and less entertainment for content but the BBC is good at making its home page good for a quick glance through.

    For ideas have a look at http://www.ebizmba.com/articles/news-websites and http://www.alexa.com/topsites/category/News
  • MegiMegi Posts: 6,774Member
    Appreciate the links and ideas, thanks for that Lester. Just FWIW, when I posted this thread, I was looking specifically at the BBC's news home page, not their overall home page - and at that point Mary Berry's leaving Bake Off was the headline news story. They've changed that since, but still a bit ridiculous I thought.
  • LesterLester Posts: 1,513Member, Moderator
    edited September 2016
    Megi said:

    I was looking specifically at the BBC's news home page, not their overall home page

    Me too; I forgot that the BBC has a different home page as my bookmark is for the news. I have noticed how, over the last year, maybe two, the magazine content has gone up and the news content has gone down - and also the lack of proof-reading but that's another story although probably brought on by the same editorial policy.

    I use Reuters.
  • Derek_RDerek_R Posts: 1,635Member
    Whenever it's Grand Prix weekend you can guarantee there'll be a Lewis Hamilton piece on the front page (not the Sports front page, but the News front page). I wonder if the news editors will offer such things the same level of newsworthiness once the contract is no longer with the BBC?
  • JockoJocko Posts: 6,870Member, Moderator
    The BBC no longer has the contract. Channel 4 has it now. As is evident by the dearth of F1 news on the BBC Red Button.
    I like to follow CNN and Al Jazeerra as well as the BBC. And on TV, I watch RT (Russia Today). That way I feel I get all the propaganda and it is up to me to make my own judgement as to what is happening.
  • Derek_RDerek_R Posts: 1,635Member
    Jocko said:

    The BBC no longer has the contract. Channel 4 has it now.

    Shows how much attention I pay to it! I thought their focus on it was because they had the contract, but I guess it's because they see it as being front page news then. I don't. But then I don't see Bake-Off or Brangelina being front page news - which is where we came in.

    I must admit, I'm trying to reduce my web usage to a minimum this days - I get most of my news from the wireless... alas, it's BBC stations I'm listening to :-(

  • MegiMegi Posts: 6,774Member
    Thank you for the replies and thoughts chaps. Jocko, you make me realise something I should have known already, or at least hadn't admitted to myself, which is that there is no such thing as unbiased news. The very idea is probably impossible in fact, so I can't really blame the various providers for failing there. Just one of those things - it's all propaganda at some level, so of course your approach makes sense.
  • LesterLester Posts: 1,513Member, Moderator
    edited September 2016
    Unbelievable! There is an article today on Bake Off on the NME's web site. The New Musical Express - I thought the clue was in the name, Musical, but it seems no longer to be the case.

    Maybe Jocko is right as The Moscow Times doesn't include UK TV programmes in its news.
  • MegiMegi Posts: 6,774Member
    A long time ago I used to sometimes buy the NME (late 80s/early 90s) - I don't know why, because I could almost guarantee that if I'd discovered an artist or band I liked, some smart-a$%* right-on NME journalist would be slagging them off before too long. I actually think they did real and undeserved harm to some careers. So in my view, the people at that publication never knew much about music, and it's no surprise that they appear to be clueless enough to think the whole Bake Off thing is worth covering.

    Sorry for the rant, you touched a bit of a nerve with that one Lester... :wink:
  • Derek_RDerek_R Posts: 1,635Member
    I was a Sounds man back in the seventies. Still have some clippings tucked away in my LP sleeves.
  • onemanbandonemanband Posts: 90Member
    edited September 2016
    Remember a line from an old Housemartins song..........."I get all the news I need on the weather report" ?
  • LesterLester Posts: 1,513Member, Moderator
    Paul Simon used the same line in his song Only Living Boy in New York.
  • Mark PMark P Posts: 2,214Member
    Jocko is right - every news based broadcast by whatever provider has some sort of agenda, otherwise known as bias. The more you cast about looking for information elsewhere the more you uncover factual and filmed accounts that contradict what you've seen before.

    I find myself now when I am accidentally exposed to a news programme wondering what the real truth is of the story they're giving, and why they might twist it to their backers advantage.

    Basically news programmes are like politicians - you know they are telling lies when you can hear them talking. Don't get me started on newspapers - they're every bit as bad.

    I also wonder what all those members of staff seen when the cameras whirl around the news building at the start of the news actually do. Most of the stories are just regurgitated verbatim from news agencies or Westminster.

    In passing will someone please get newsreaders chairs to sit on. Or do they have no money for furniture with all the money they pay the celebrities that appear on 99.9% of the programmes.

    On a lighter note I remember reading NME, Sounds and Melody Maker. I also remember how the NME changed into being oh so very cynical ... and so very tedious. Oh dear, I am in a good mood tonight! :smiley:
  • Kevin PeatKevin Peat Posts: 2,779Member
    I've noticed that Radio 2 is getting much better in music selection. There is much more variety in the 70s/80s/90s catalogue. All I ever seemed to hear for years was Queen and Roxy Music. I used to like both until they were played to death.

    It seemed to be Bohemian Rhapsody or I Want to Break Free at least once in every drive time.

    Recently I've heard: Visage, Tears for Fears, Billy Idol, New Order, Pulp, Oasis, OMD, Human League...
  • Derek_RDerek_R Posts: 1,635Member
    Heard a Seth Lakeman track and a Gregory Porter track I really liked whilst driving home earlier this week. There was even some Ella Fitzgerald.
  • MegiMegi Posts: 6,774Member
    Cheers for the Reuters link Kevin, hadn't thought of that one.
  • Kevin PeatKevin Peat Posts: 2,779Member
    My pleasure.
  • ESBlondeESBlonde Posts: 805Member
    Once again the BBC went beyond reporting because they had the rights to the olympics (world sports day). While people starved and died through the killing the news headlines were all about sportsday. I accept the challenges are significant and the dedication immense, but people do that and more everyday in the NHS frontline or local schools.
    The magazine type presentation has become irritating to me, only eclipsed by my irritation of the corbin supporters saying how biased the BBC reporting is toward their minority opinions.
    There was a time when a sober suited gentlemen (or lady) read the news and backed it up with facts and possibly an outsibe broadcast. Now we get sent to a presenter actually 'there' who repeats the bland statement of facts just given by the anchorman and then gets some 'guest puppet' to agree and add weight to the bland facts before handing back to the sofa. Stateing the bleedin' obvious is not reporting.
  • Kevin PeatKevin Peat Posts: 2,779Member
    "Stateing the bleedin' obvious is not reporting"

    They do degrees in the subject now, you know.
  • Mark PMark P Posts: 2,214Member
    Wouldn't it be great if the interviewers, particularly the apologies that pass for political correspondents, could react to what replies are made by the guest and have a proper discussion evolve. Way too much of the time their researchers have done a set list of questions for the interviewer and they just plough through regardless of what might be said. That's assuming they get any straight answers of course!

    I caught (accidentally) a bit of the BBC politics on the TV today and they were getting the public's reactions to jokes (I use the term loosely) out of a political joke book. Never mind addressing some of the very serious issues of the day and holding people in power to account, lets have a groan and laugh at weak jokes.
  • MegiMegi Posts: 6,774Member
    Mark P said:



    I caught (accidentally) a bit of the BBC politics on the TV today and they were getting the public's reactions to jokes (I use the term loosely) out of a political joke book. Never mind addressing some of the very serious issues of the day and holding people in power to account, lets have a groan and laugh at weak jokes.

    I think they try to not be all serious and po-faced through such programs Mark, and to be fair, I think they have a point there, in that having a sense of humour (sometime wry humour) is a very human and certainly British thing. To an extent I think it needs to be there, even when dealing with the serious matters of the day, and definitely when talking about the behavior of some politicians. I don't think the politics programs on the BBC are all that bad truthfully - The Daily Politics for example, seems reasonably well done to me. Not saying they're perfect by any means, and the example you raise may well have been shallow and trivial, when there were more pressing things to deal with, although I didn't see it myself.

    My gripe is more with the corporation's general news coverage, and it's priorities there - the thing that caused me to start this thread for example, which was seeing the Mary Berry leaves Bake Off shocker incongruously placed in front of the resumption of bombing in Aleppo.


  • Kevin PeatKevin Peat Posts: 2,779Member
    edited September 2016
    Humour shows lateral thinking, which often aids problem solving.

    Think of the whacky British machines invented to get over obstacles in the D-Day landings - they were known as 'the funnies' - the subterfuge and use of parachutist dolls to divert the enemy's attention.

    All required looking at things from a tangent. The Nazi enemy were too rigid in their thinking.

    Who else could have thougth of a bouncing bomb other than the British ?
  • Kevin PeatKevin Peat Posts: 2,779Member
    From a constructive perspective - when the Dawlish sea wall came down everyone thought they were going to have to build a Mulberry Harbour to protect repair works from the sea.

    A chearful navvie came along and said "Nah. Get a load of empty sea containers, drop them in a line and fill them with pebbles."

    Overnight the town was saved and work started right away - hence the repairs were done in record time. And while the line was closed they brought forward all sorts of repairs and got them done.

    If you've been dealt lemons... make lemonade !
  • Kevin PeatKevin Peat Posts: 2,779Member
    Aleppo has been caused by people taking things (religion) too seriously.
  • Richards GuitarsRichards Guitars Posts: 588Member, Administrator
    Megi said:

    I know I've disagreed in the past with some forum members about the BBC's news reporting. However, of late I have to admit I'm finding their website in particular, to be rather shallow, and not showing the priorities I think it should. For example, the lead news story at the moment is that Mary Berry will be leaving Bake Off - tragic I'm sure you'll agree, but not really of any importance to me. It's a problem I've felt for a while, and I fear is getting worse.

    But I do like to keep up with current events, both world and UK, and I like to follow the various political goings-on, plus I welcome a bit of insightful analysis, and intelligent comment and opinion. Can anyone recommend any altenative places to go to on the web? Cheers!

    Funny you should say this. Only last night I posted my disgrace at the story they ran on Syria. 100% Russian demonisation and totally "agenda bias". What they implied was preposterous in the article, is in fact 100% accurate which is that the USA have been funding terrorists in order to over throw the Assad regime. Its all so obvious yet you would never believe it if you watched the BBC. The USA is a disgrace and both the UK and USA have abysmal records for destabalising the World in the pursuit of oil and profit.

    The BBC news is a disgrace.
  • MegiMegi Posts: 6,774Member
    "A disgrace" is somewhat stronger than I would put things to be honest Richard, though not to say you don't make some good points above. Is there a particular news service that you prefer for a more balanced view of things though?
  • Kevin PeatKevin Peat Posts: 2,779Member
    Richard isn't the only one to see it that way. The BBC really don't like Vlad. I think it was probably his stance on homosexuals which set them against him at the Sochi Olympics.
  • MegiMegi Posts: 6,774Member

    Richard isn't the only one to see it that way. The BBC really don't like Vlad. I think it was probably his stance on homosexuals which set them against him at the Sochi Olympics.

    I'm sure he isn't the only one with that opinion Kevin, and indeed we're all entitled to our views. Myself, I do tend to think the Western countries, and the US in particular, have a somewhat naive idea that countries with oppressive regimes/dictatorships can be guided towards democracy, and that it is always a good idea to pursue that. Putin, for my money, looks at the world more pragmatically thinking about the benefits of stability, and I'd say he's more often right about that. But let's not pretend he's a saint, and Russia Today is a wonderful news service that presents a totally realistic, neutral view of things...
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