Where to place the amp?

Strat_LordStrat_Lord Posts: 30Member
Hey guys!I'v recently renovated one of the rooms in my house, of which has a Party wall with my neighbours bedroom. In addition this wall I have added to the walls density by tiling Slim Bricks (a brick tile with 1 inch depth) creating a feature wall. Wont do the acoustics im the room many favours but among other things It's easily fixable by hanging canvas art with acoustic foam inside haha Anyway I was wondering as it doesnt really bother me, but with regards to the neighbours where in the room would it be kindest of me to place the amp?  I only really have two options I have are on the opposite wall, facing the brick covered party wall....ORWith its back to the brick covered wall facing away from the Neighbours A factor to consider. The amp I use is a Two-Rock Studio 35 head with matching 1x12 cab and like to mimic John Mayers tone so that means a lot of bass a lot of trebble and mids turned downThanks a lot, Will  

Comments

  • JockoJocko Posts: 6,871Member, Moderator

    Back to the wall and lift the cab off the floor.

  • Strat_LordStrat_Lord Posts: 30Member

    Awesome thanks Jacko!  

     

     

  • Kevin PeatKevin Peat Posts: 3,010Member

    I only play at TV volume or with headphones in. 

    Having been victim to an aspiring next-door rock muso I wouldn't inflict my own efforts on anyone. 

  • LesterLester Posts: 1,575Member, Moderator
    edited August 2016

    You need to isolate the amp from the building - which is what Jocko said: get it off the floor. That way flanking sound - the sound that travels through the structure like when drilling into a wall - will be minimised.

    Bass frequencies are omnidirectional and have the longest wavelengths and so these will be the sounds that travel through walls, just like the sound outside a club or disco where you cannot hear the higher frequencies but you can hear the thump thump of the bass. Kevin's suggestion is the only guaranteed one in a semi-detached house: play at TV volume or with headphones in.

    As for acoustics in your music room, foam is usually too thin and so only sucks the life out of the higher frequencies. A minimum of 100mm of mineral wool inside your canvas cover would be more effective. Just make sure that the canvas is breathable, ie. you can blow through it.

  • Kevin PeatKevin Peat Posts: 3,010Member

    Lester - For the life of me I can't understand why they build semis with adjoining living quarters. Why don't they mirror the houses the other way around with bathroom, kitchen, hallway and stairwells adjoining instead ?

    One house I lived in I would frequently hear the hubby burp and fart. 

    I now live detached but have a lodger, so still have to be reasonable. 

  • Kevin PeatKevin Peat Posts: 3,010Member

    ... I assume it was the hubby anyway. His wife was a clairvoyant. 

  • LesterLester Posts: 1,575Member, Moderator

    My guess, Kevin, is that the living rooms will be warmer with fewer outside walls and, historically at least, families spent more time together in the living room and so I guess that's why they were designed that way (emphasis on guess).

    I was happy with that arrangement in my last house as the dining room was furthest away from the neighbours and it worked fairly well as a music room once I had put a second door on it (opening in the opposite direction and with good seals).

    I now live in a flat and can hear the neighbours above all the time. I found the only solution was to rent a room in an office block where I can play (rehearse) at office conversation level during the day and louder during evenings, weekends and bank holidays. Now I can burp and fart and no one hears!

  • Kevin PeatKevin Peat Posts: 3,010Member

    Good answer, Lester. 

    A philosphical question:

    If you burp or fart in a semi and there is no-one around to hear it does it make a sound ?

    I suppose levitation could be the answer to flanking frequencies.

  • Reg SoxReg Sox Posts: 3,121Member
    Lester posted:

    My guess, Kevin, is that the living rooms will be warmer with fewer outside walls and, historically at least, families spent more time together in the living room and so I guess that's why they were designed that way (emphasis on guess).

    There's structural considerations as well.  Traditionally the living rooms were where the fires were.  It's a lot less complex in terms of roofing (and therefore cost) to construct a two back to back chimneys in the middle of the two semis rather than chimneys at each end of the structure where the external stack would have to be built up higher due to the slope of the roof.  An external stack at the end also wastes a lot of heat via dissipation through the external walls.

    But to Kev's point, modern insulation in houses that don't have open fires shouldn't present a problem in terms of the room configuration he suggests.

    Cheers, Reg.

  • Screaming DaveScreaming Dave Posts: 777Member

    Kev, the burper or farter is always around to hear it so it must make a sound.  Now, supposing the burper/farter is deaf ......

     

  • ESBlondeESBlonde Posts: 859Member

    Dave, in that case you sit on their thigh so they can feel the vibrations!

     

  • BonydalBonydal Posts: 63Member
    Kevin Peat posted:

    Lester - For the life of me I can't understand why they build semis with adjoining living quarters. Why don't they mirror the houses the other way around with bathroom, kitchen, hallway and stairwells adjoining instead ?

    One house I lived in I would frequently hear the hubby burp and fart. 

    I now live detached but have a lodger, so still have to be reasonable. 

    Semis have adjoining living rooms so the chimney can be shared. Saves building two chimneys... I don't think much consideration was given to curry eating beer drinkers.  

  • Screaming DaveScreaming Dave Posts: 777Member

    ... or loud guitarists.  Mad really when you think that the Victorian science fiction writers, like H.G. Wells, anticipated flying machines, war in the skies, nuclear weapons, but never thought to re-design the humble Victorian semi to take account of electrically amplified instruments.

    If you think about it, most Victorian parlours had a piano and they weren't all budding Beethovens.  Grandma getting tanked up on cheap gin and banging our "Roll Out The Barrel" at all hours can't have been fun for anyone, so you'd have though they'd have re-designed the house for that reason alone .....

    .... oh, hang on, they invented the workhouse to put grandma in!

Sign In or Register to comment.