Tesco

Reg SoxReg Sox Posts: 3,121Member
edited August 2016 in Totally Not Guitars
Tesco Names 43 Stores to Close Including the Kirkcaldy Superstore - that would be local to you wouldn't it Jocko? So these people who don't know their parent's names, come in, bulldoze their way through local planning processes (I never mentioned bungs), push up the price of land through buying at any cost, then destroy the livelyhoods of small local businesses through selling below cost in combination with completely screwing their suppliers. Just when you think they couldn't possibly destroy any more lives, as soon as the going gets a bit tough they up sticks and walk away leaving even more people out of work. What a bunch of complete sh!ts.  Of course Tesco isn't the only culprit, all the big supermarkets are the same. Disillusioned Reg.  

Comments

  • JockoJocko Posts: 7,046Member, Moderator

    It is a bit of a disappointment that store closing. It is understandable though. It is a big store, but doesn't have its own car park. There is a pay to park, council one on the roof, but it is old and not very convenient. Mrs J uses the store regularly when she is in the town, or gets off the bus (bus station right next door), but it is never a big shop she does. Just what she can carry in a bag. Probably most shoppers do likewise.

    We have an Asda, Morrisons, M&S, Lidl and two Aldi's, in or on the edge of the town, all with their own dedicated free parking, so Tesco had an arm tied behind their back.

  • Reg SoxReg Sox Posts: 3,121Member

    Heck, I'm going to have to look up how big Kirkcaldy is!

  • Reg SoxReg Sox Posts: 3,121Member

    I've looked Kirkcaldy up - a very long and interesting history.

     

    But a population under 50,000 and seven supermarkets?  Is there any independent greengrocer, butcher, or fishmonger left?

     

    My nearest town is Britain's largest (i.e. largest place that isn't officially a city).  Reading has a population of over 155,000.  I don't think Reading has more than that number of supermarkets!  OK, maybe one or two, but not 21+, which would be the equivalent by population.

     

    You really have to question the collective business logic of continuing to build additional stores when the population isn't exponentially expanding.  To attract customers they have to outprice each other.  It's a race to the bottom and who blinks first.  In this case Tesco.  It's not really about the customer, it's about last one or two standing so that when supermarket capacity reaches equilibrium with population density prices go up and the customer is left with no choice as independents are gone and won't come back.

     

    All part of homegenisation that I keep banging on about.

     

    Still Disillusioned Reg.

  • BryBry Posts: 652Member
    Originally Posted by Reg Sox:

     

    My nearest town is Britain's largest (i.e. largest place that isn't officially a city).  Reading has a population of over 155,000.  I don't think Reading has more than that number of supermarkets!  OK, maybe one or two, but not 21+, which would be the equivalent by population.

     

     

    Reading has more than its share of Tescos mind, four last time I looked, plus two or three Sainsburys along with Waitrose, Asda and all the rest.

  • Kevin PeatKevin Peat Posts: 3,144Member

    No-one is forced to shop at a supermarket.

     

    We get homogeny because - despite saying otherwise - we want it. The money flow says so. 

  • Reg SoxReg Sox Posts: 3,121Member

    Good point -  if you count all the surrounding areas such as Twyford, Tilehurst, Caversham etc there's probably quite a few.  But then there's loads of independent shops in centralish Reading serving various immigrant communities that survive and provide interesting places to have a nose around and shop.  But no fishmongers left in Smelly Alley - hasn't been ever since I moved locally.  I honestly don't know where I would find a fishmonger anywhere near where I live.  And the Oracle shopping centre could be anywhere.

     

    I imagine Reading, like most large towns had vibrant Town Centres back before the rise of Sainsburys in the sixties.

     

    At least local to me, while we have no shops in the village, we have farm shops that are putting up some resistance to the supermarkets by providing quality product, choice, and a personal service.  And there is a proper butcher and greengrocer three miles from my house.

     

    I just about remember my local Sainsburys when it was a proper shop with all it's different individual counters where you were served by people before it became a supermarket.  I recall wonderful shop architecture/fitments with lots of tilework and mirrors with packages wrapped and stowed by my mother in a proper shopping bag before plastic carriers.

     

    Different era.  I've turned into my parents!  Glad I don't have kids to despair of me and vice versa!

     

    Cheers, Reg.

  • Reg SoxReg Sox Posts: 3,121Member
    Originally Posted by Kevin Peat:

    No-one is forced to shop at a supermarket.

     

    We get homogeny because - despite saying otherwise - we want it. The money flow says so. 

    Please don't include me in "we".  I am very choosy about where I spend my money.  Unfortunately there's not enough of me, and you are forcing homogeneity on me

  • Kevin PeatKevin Peat Posts: 3,144Member

    I don't know. 

     

    We've never had such choice and varied diets. The other issue is that it's usually the woman who does the shopping - now that she has to have a job too it's good to have it all in one stop and under one roof. 

     

    I too would like to know where all the fish is going. We don't get much here and we live at a fishing port !  To London restaurants and to the EU possibly. 

  • Reg SoxReg Sox Posts: 3,121Member

    Yes, the whole time/convenience thing is the main cause.  And you were absolutely right about the money flow particularly as the majority of new mothers go back to work.

     

    Mine didn't until my youngest sister was about 14, and neither did the majority of her generation.

     

    We didn't have freezers and food was bought fresh.  I recall pre-school age shopping trips as being infinitely tedious as we trailed around different shops and mother meeting other women and chatting and several women and the woman behind the counter all chinwagging.  Shopping was a fairly sociable chore for my mother, and probably took ten times as long as a whizz round the supermarket.  As a family I was the first person to learn to drive and own a car.  So shopping was a regular exercise not only due to buying food fresh, but also due to carrying power.

     

    I was part of that changover generation.  Very few people I knew had cars when I was in junior school. I don't remember a car park in the town centre either - what cars there were just parked on the road.  Yet by the time I left school the majority of families seemed to have a car - not us just yet at that time, but then we never had a telephone either until my second job when I had to be on-call.  Transport was bikes, buses, trains, or Shank's.

     

    Me and Mrs Sox are in the minority in that we tend to shy away from supermarkets and leave them as a last choice..  We know the names of the people who serve us in the places we shop, and they know ours.  Probably costs us a bloody fortune.  If we had kids we'd be under completely different pressures.

     

    As you say it's about the money flow.  Everyone wants the cheapest product possible so we get fed tasteless crap wrapped up in polystyrene and cling film.  No one gives a toss about factory farmed chickens, meat not being what it says it is, farmers having to sell milk below cost, bull calves being slaughtered at seven days because the supermarkets demand prices so low it's uneconomical to rear them so we import, disappearing stocks of certain fish species etc until it's pointed out.  Then there's uproar.  Bugger me people, just look in the fricking mirror!

     

    Cheers, Reg.

  • JockoJocko Posts: 7,046Member, Moderator
    Originally Posted by Reg Sox:

    But a population under 50,000 and seven supermarkets?  Is there any independent greengrocer, butcher, or fishmonger left?

    Yes to all three, and several bakers (not counting Greggs!)

    And I forgot about Sainsburys, The Co-op and Farmfoods (no car park).

  • Reg SoxReg Sox Posts: 3,121Member

    So, while Tescos are busy closing down stores and making people redundant because they have too many stores, they (and M&S) are busy making people's lives a misery in other ways:

     

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-mid-wales-31138687

     

    Good for Enid standing up to them, but it seems it's done no good.  I'm just waiting for the next report in probably two month's time that having destroyed 12 homes, they've had another financial review and decided to mothball the development.

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