I've designed a guitar stand

charlesmcewancharlesmcewan Posts: 9Member
I need some information please from accoustic guitar players about their guitar stands. Would you prefer to have a stand that will not fall over in any directions but is so small you can store it inside the case and is almost invisible when in use i.e. it displays the guitar, not the metal tubes that hold it. I've designed such a model but am wondering if the stability plus portability would be attractive to guitarists.

Comments

  • LesterLester Posts: 1,599Member, Moderator
    edited August 2016

    Such a compact stand is an interesting thought but without a photo or drawing I cannot imagine how useful it might prove to be although I have so far been fortunate in that during 40 years of gigging there have only been a few times when my guitar has been knocked over. I am curious that you say it is an acoustic guitar stand as my electric stands only differ in the width of body they hold.

  • JockoJocko Posts: 6,954Member, Moderator

    This is my acoustic on it's stand, which is perfectly acceptable and commercially available.

     

    1988 Epiphone PR350-S 11-8-12

  • AndyjrAndyjr Posts: 659Member

    There is a wooden stand on the market that folds small enough to go under the headstock in a standard hard case.  I'll try to find a photo of it. It is ingenious. 

  • charlesmcewancharlesmcewan Posts: 9Member

    Fantastic. Is it for an accoustic guitar?

  • COGCOG Posts: 30Member

    I guess this is the thing -

    http://www.stringsdirect.co.uk...ar-stand-pro-g-p6973

     

    ... pricey, but nicey. I use them and like them.

     

    The guitar is very stable when sitting in one of these. They also make a mini-version just right for mandolin/uke etc, and more economical plastic versions of the large one, including a glow-in-the-dark model.

     

    Yes, they do fold up nicely, but I wouldn't want one rattling around under my guitar neck in a case, even if it did fit, which it wouldn't in my cases anyway. perfect for gigbag pockets though.

     

    COG

  • stickyfiddlestickyfiddle Posts: 355Member

    I use a little Hercules floor stand as below. It doesn't look much but it's remarkably stable. 

     

    I'm sure I'd get something bigger if I had kids but for a quiet home and reasonably sized stage it's fine.

     

    http://elderly.com/images/accessories/ACC/HGS401B.jpg

  • charlesmcewancharlesmcewan Posts: 9Member

    Thanks guys, I've seen the Hercules one but not the other one. I've attached a couple of pics which show my stand on the ground and still attached to the strap button when the guitar is lifted. That's what makes it stable in all directions. The legs are much thinner than those on conventional stands and I plan to have the front legs thinner so they can slot inside inside the rear legs making it even more portable. The fixing mechanism is only 9 cm long and 6 cm wide so it stays attached to the peg when stored in the case. The two legs can then be attached to the neck so they won't wobble in the case.

    20141016 pic for forum 1

    20141016 pic for forum 2

  • Reg SoxReg Sox Posts: 3,121Member

    Hi Charles,

     

    I guess I struggling with how your device works.

     

    Are you saying the stand stays permanently attached to the guitar via the peg, even when playing?  Or do you have to disengage the stand from the peg somehow, and if so, how fiddly is that compared to just lifting it off a conventional stand?

     

    Is there enough clearance above the floor to enable an electro-acoustic to remain plugged in via a strap peg socket when the stand is employed?

     

    What's the front and/or rear view - I'm struggling to see any additional stability offered over a conventional stand as from the pics it still looks susceptible to a sideways knock and therefore I'm perhaps not understanding the problem you are trying to solve.  If it's just the portability of the stand for gigging I'd personally far rather carry a substantial stand separately than risk my investment in my guitars just for the sake of saving a trip from my car.

     

    Cheers, Reg.

  • charlesmcewancharlesmcewan Posts: 9Member

    Hi Reg, The guitar is removed from the stand when playing.

     

    The pic shows the previous prototype which involved using your hand to attach and remove the guitar. I think guitarists want to be able to easily attach and remove while the stand is on the floor so I have changed the design which uses a foot pedal it is not fiddly. There is a locating mechanism to make it easy to attach. It has the same stability as stands with a neck extension because if you push it over in any direction, the whole stand comes with the guitar.

     

    If the electro accoustic socket goes through the strap button it needs to be removed to attach the guitar to the stand as does the strap itself. However there is a similar locking mechanism on the strap so that the guitarist can easily clip the strap to the button. Sounds like you don't see the portabilty/stability combination as a particular advantage. 

  • Reg SoxReg Sox Posts: 3,121Member

    Hi Charles,

     

    Personally, no I don't.  But that doesn't mean that others wouldn't find it attractive - I'm a somewhat statistically insignificant sample of one

     

    My other concern from a practical point if view is if gigging (which I don't currently do, but thinking back to when I used to) I'd have to mess about with the strap and guitar lead before being able to play.

     

    From a stage craft point of view I'd have to be remembering to mute the signal each time I put the lead either in or out, and then have to remember to do the strap and lead in the right order as well.  All seems like a bunch of extra juggling and coordination (including feet for the mute, and the guitar stand) if I wanted to make a quick swap between electric and acoustic, or vice versa, actually during a song - could I do it seamlessly in 4 bars?.  If this is primarily aimed at gigging (which presumably is the main thrust of the portability angle) then these are some of the practical considerations.

     

    Again I'm just a sample of one, and perhaps for someone who just occasionally changes guitars between songs it might not be so much of an issue - but there again, if you're a singer guitarist trying to do a bit of banter from the stage between songs this also might be a bit distracting.

     

    Might be worth going to some live music to specifically observe the way guitarists deal with guitar changes, break down what they do into steps and determine what impact your device might, or might not, have on their overall stage craft.

     

    Hopefully this isn't coming across too negatively and helps  - I spent many many years as a Product Manager and I've just realised I've subconsciously slipped my old PM hat on!

     

    Cheers, Reg.

  • charlesmcewancharlesmcewan Posts: 9Member

    Excellent reply Reg. Just what I wanted. I absolutely agree that if amplifiers are being used, then the portability is not an important characteristic at all.

     

    I tend to play in folk clubs and I see people with a thing that they screw on to the table in the pub and which goes round the neck of the guitar to prevent it falling but the base of the guitar is on the ground which I never liked. They don't want to keep putting it back in the case every time and they don't have amplification so I'm thinking that being able to move the guitar and stand easily just by grabbing the neck of the guitar could be attractive. The other thing I like is that when you have it at home you hardly see the stand because it is hidden by the guitar so it is the guitar which is on display not the metal tubes.  Can I ask you, imagine, you were in a guitar shop buying a guitar for your own use at home or maybe playing with friends and you had a choice between the normal stand with a neck for stability in all directions or this one and the price difference was about 5 quid would you still go for the neck extension one?

  • JockoJocko Posts: 6,954Member, Moderator

    Charles.  The stability aspect looks to have been addressed.  Most of my acoustic guitars have Schaller style locking buttons on them.  Will your design work with them?

  • Reg SoxReg Sox Posts: 3,121Member

    It's a good question Charles, but one you are unfortunately asking to the totally wrong person.

     

    I'm actually one of those people that would be bothered to put their guitar back in the case every time unless I was doing a set on stage - hence why I only talked about that situation.

     

    My playing background is in the folk clubs also, and with the amount of movement around with floor spots, especially on singers/open mic nights the last thing I'd do is leave my guitar out on a stand.  I still have my old guitar stands, but these days they live in the loft until I start gigging again.  Even at home I never leave my guitars out - they always live in their respective cases.

     

    Having said that, we're in the process of doing up a couple of our rooms, including getting a proper library sorted with some custom made bookcases.  So imagine how gobsmacked I was when Mrs Sox said to me "Wouldn't you like to have a few of your guitars on display?".  So shortly I shall have three electric guitar sized glass fronted cabinets built into one wall's worth of the bookcases.  These will be used for my own builds and will have a stand designed into each cabinet.  But unfortunately still no need for a traditional (or new design) standalone guitar stand - sorry!

     

    Cheers, Reg.

  • Kevin PeatKevin Peat Posts: 3,043Member

     

    This one is light, stable, folds flat (more important than small) and is cheap. (I got mine for £5)

  • charlesmcewancharlesmcewan Posts: 9Member

    Old Timer, Yes you are right. My one has the same function as the Schaller mechanism on the strap but it acts in tandem with the stand so that when the strap is removed, the same mechanism is used to attach it to the stand. I;ve designed it to be really easy to locate but as Reg has indicated it all depends on whether people like the idea of 360 degree stability plus storing it inside the case. The feedback I am getting is really useful.

  • LesterLester Posts: 1,599Member, Moderator
    edited August 2016
    Originally Posted by charlesmcewan:

    ... a stand that will not fall over in any directions ...

    This is the part that I am waiting to see as guitars get knocked off stands, it's happened to me - and once by me (it was my guitar)!

  • charlesmcewancharlesmcewan Posts: 9Member

    Lester, as you know even a guitar stand with a neck can be knocked over if it is pushed too far. However, they have to be pushed pretty far. Here's a picture of my one. As you can see from the vertical lines on the backdrop, it has to be pushed pretty far to get to the tipping point. You can also see that the stand is almost invisible thus displaying the full beauty of the guitar. The question I want to know is whether guitarists find the stability plus storing inside the case a significant advantage.

  • LesterLester Posts: 1,599Member, Moderator

    Thanks for the photo. I wish you well with it; you have a lot of other stands to compete with.

  • charlesmcewancharlesmcewan Posts: 9Member
    Originally Posted by Lester:

     

    Such a compact stand is an interesting thought but without a photo or drawing I cannot imagine how useful it might prove to be although I have so far been fortunate in that during 40 years of gigging there have only been a few times when my guitar has been knocked over. I am curious that you say it is an acoustic guitar stand as my electric stands only differ in the width of body they hold.

     Finally, I've had the video made showing the existing prototype but also showing the magnetic functionality of the new design. Still have to get it manufactured so that will take about 6 months.                                                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Q1s6shcDI86shcDI8

     

  • LesterLester Posts: 1,599Member, Moderator
    edited August 2016

    Thanks for the video. I now see what you are trying to accomplish. I wish you success; creating a new product and getting it to sell is quite a challenge.

    I am wondering what (or who) is your target market. I think of the main users of a compact, portable stand will be those that travel and play live. I have 4 acoustic guitars and on all of them the strap pin doubles as the jack socket and so a stand that allows me to leave the cable plugged in would be essential. The video made it look too close to the ground and the bracket that holds the strap pin looked like you couldn't take the stand off while a cable is plugged in. So I am thinking that it's not going to be useful for folks that would like a portable stand.

    On the other hand, bedroom players may not need to plug into an amp or PA and so the design of the stand could work well for them except that lightness, compactness, portability are not requirements of a stand that will stay put in a bedroom.

    So I am trying to figure out who is your target market. It may be best for competitive reasons that you don't reply. I am not involved with any stand maker but you never know who else is looking at a public forum.

  • charlesmcewancharlesmcewan Posts: 9Member

    Hi Lester, no worries about competitors - I've got it patented. Yes you are right, you need to unplug to fit it in. Also there is a magnetic attachment for the shoulder strap so when the guitar us removed from the stand, the strap can be clicked on really easily.

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