Blueridge BR60 dreadnought

13

Comments

  • Bob IsaacBob Isaac Posts: 70Member
    I have just strung my Everly 180 with Gibson J-200 bronze 12/53's and they give a very good sound. I wonder how the 180 would sound without pickguards.

    Bob
  • MegiMegi Posts: 6,748Member
     Originally Posted By: Surfsilver
     Originally Posted By: Megi
    I would agree that the idea of fixing a "rubber donut" as you put it , inside a perfectly good acoustic guitar might seem a bit dubious, but I really think there is something to be said for the o-port, IMO it's surprisingly good.

    Yeah, or just maybe Chuck Kaman had a point about replacing the skeleton of a traditional acoustic with a tech developed Lyrachord monocoque? Each to their own, as is right, but my 6 string has served 40 odd years with no fear of replacement and remains the guitar everyone wants to play when we have an acoustic knock-about.

     Quote:
    cheers for the pic also, is that one yours Surf?

    Err no, just a lazy web pic of the same sort of thing. But, as you’ve shown me yours often enough \:o , I don’t mind showing you mine.

    A brace, both 70’s, both medium roundbacks no cutaway, both stock. Case is Ovation but not original with the 6 string. Couldn’t afford one then. Don’t remember when I got the black one, which I thought was brown anyway, in which case I don’t know where the brown one is, if there was one, but I thought there was?

    Appreciate the trend now is towards shallow backs with pickups, which I find a bit too toppy for my general play – though work well with recording and/or using in Nashville tuning. The fat backs are good but for me a bit too loud.

    Sorry Surf, rude of me not to have replied earlier, but cheers for the pic. I can well believe what you say about the volume of the fat back ovations. I remember going to see Roy Harper (yes the mavarick hippy singer-songwriter chap!) in the late 80s it would have been (at the Leeds Irish Centre IIRC, in case anyone remember the gig!) - anyway, he had a blue carbon-top Ovation Adamas with what looked to be the full deep back, no cutaway. OK it was going through the PA system (plus he had several boss effects) but all the same, that thing had some major sound projection going on - just something about the sheer strength of sound he was getting, very impressive.
  • MegiMegi Posts: 6,748Member
     Originally Posted By: Alidore
    After reading this thread I just fitted an oport, makes a nice difference on my £100 elecro acoustic. Seems to be based on an old principle. Velocity Stack
    Very interesting, cheers Alidore. Glad you like the o-port, I'm still happy with it on my guitar. Still waiting for the bone nut/saddle/bridge pins to arrive from Hong Kong - to be fair, they did say delivery can take a while though.
  • MegiMegi Posts: 6,748Member
     Originally Posted By: Bob Isaac
    I have just strung my Everly 180 with Gibson J-200 bronze 12/53's and they give a very good sound. I wonder how the 180 would sound without pickguards.

    Bob
    I can't answer that question for sure, but I do know fitting a pickguard to my acoustic has made surprisingly little difference to the sound. In fact I'll go further and say I can't tell any difference at all!
  • Options
     Originally Posted By: Megi
    Sorry Surf, rude of me not to have replied earlier

    What! Take a teaspoon of almond oil and play an Em11 in the third position immediately!

     Originally Posted By: Alidore
    Seems to be based on an old principle. Velocity Stack

    Sorry, don't follow. Can you explain please?
  • Options
     Originally Posted By: Megi
    Roy Harper had a blue carbon-top Ovation Adamas with what looked to be the full deep back, no cutaway.


    http://www.musicpower.com/mmMUSICPOWER/Images/AGOWTJ-1687RBB-f.jpg

    I wish \:\(
  • Pete_BPete_B Posts: 28Member
     Originally Posted By: Surfsilver

    Sorry, don't follow. Can you explain please?


    Makes the sound(airflow) out of the hole smoother

    Like these

  • AlidoreAlidore Posts: 527Member
     Originally Posted By: Surfsilver

    Sorry, don't follow. Can you explain please?


    Makes the sound(airflow) out of the hole smoother

    Like these

    Pete.

    “There are 10 kinds of people in the world: those who understand binary, and those who don't.”
  • Bob IsaacBob Isaac Posts: 70Member
     Originally Posted By: Megi
     Originally Posted By: Bob Isaac
    I have just strung my Everly 180 with Gibson J-200 bronze 12/53's and they give a very good sound. I wonder how the 180 would sound without pickguards.

    Bob
    I can't answer that question for sure, but I do know fitting a pickguard to my acoustic has made surprisingly little difference to the sound. In fact I'll go further and say I can't tell any difference at all!

    I am putting a special order through to Gibson for a 180 and was considering having it without pickguards, so I might have them now.

    Bob
  • Options
     Originally Posted By: Alidore
    Makes the sound(airflow) out of the hole smoother

    Err yes, except that in the case of the illustration, these are ‘induction’ aids to airflow, caused by significant variation in pressures. In the case of a guitar the air in the soundbox is hardly subjected to the same variations and any fluctuations caused by the soundboard is surely in both directions and would, in the main, be self cancelling?

    And, does the whole of the bottom of the rubber donut not sit squarely on the bottom board, in which case what's the air inside the donut doing?
  • Pete_BPete_B Posts: 28Member
     Originally Posted By: Surfsilver

    And, does the whole of the bottom of the rubber donut not sit squarely on the bottom board, in which case what's the air inside the donut doing?


    It sits just inside the guitar
  • AlidoreAlidore Posts: 527Member
     Originally Posted By: Surfsilver

    And, does the whole of the bottom of the rubber donut not sit squarely on the bottom board, in which case what's the air inside the donut doing?


    It sits just inside the guitar
    Pete.

    “There are 10 kinds of people in the world: those who understand binary, and those who don't.”
  • Options
    Not having handled one, I take it that it grips the inner rim of the soundhole, and hangs clear of the bottom board? Ultimately, if someone tries one, and it works for them, end of.

    When I first looked up what one was

    Planet Waves O-Port £16?

    it reminded me of

    Partsmaster toilet gasket $1.39 \:o
  • Options
    Then again, if it is clear of the bottom board, it probably performs similar to an ear trumpet? \:\)
  • JockoJocko Posts: 6,870Member, Moderator
    Both the O-port AND the toilet gasket should sit clear of the bottom!
  • MegiMegi Posts: 6,748Member
    For the record, the o-port on my guitar extends to a bit less than half the depth of the guitar - nowhere near touching the bottom in fact. Other thoughts I've had - we are dealing with sound waves I suppose, generated by the vibrating strings, and amplified by the motion of the guitar body, mostly the top. These are not really a mass movement of air, but more like alternating bands of high and low pressure travelling away from the top, reflected by the back (and sides to a lesser extent) then up through the soundhole. But of course, some of these waves won't be aimed through the hole, and may be absorbed again. So I think the o-port works by steering more of the waves out the soundhole. Or something like that! - I'm no expert on such matters. I still like the effect on the sound anyhow.

    The set of bone parts - nut, compensated saddle and bridge pins (very nice with small abalone dot inlays) - arrived this morning from Hong Kong. I must say they all look to be excellent quality, and the dimensions seems spot on for my dreadnought style guitar - superb value for money as long as you don't mind waiting 2/3 weeks or so for delivery. When I have the energy I'll get these fitted (changing the nut will be the trickiest job, but also the saddle will need some height removing), and with a set of 13's fitted I will see where we are sound-wise. The bone has a creamy colour to it, and should look a bit classier than white plastic.
  • MegiMegi Posts: 6,748Member
    Yesterday got the new nut installed - scored around the old one with a craft knife, then a block of wood against the front edge, gentle tap with a small hammer and it came away fairly cleanly. Just a small amount of work to clean up the slot, and the new bone nut was in fact a pretty good fit straight away. Just a couple of dabs of fast-set wood glue on the base (so it should be removable again if ever needed) and the new nut was fitted. Re the new saddle I took quite a bit of material off the base to get the action low, and a little fine sanding needed to get it fitting nicely into it's slot on the bridge. The new bridge pins were a bit larger diameter than the old ones, so a little careful sanding inside the holes in the bridge needed - I just used a small bit of sandpaper wraped around an allen key of suitable size. Periodic checking for fit, and the job has been successfully acomplished.

    Today I have cut the slots in the new nut to the correct depth - I use the method where you fret the string between 2nd and 3rd fret, and you should just have a tiny bit of play with the string over the first fret, so you can hear a plink sound when you tap the string down to the fret. Although I find the A string needs just a tad more height than that, and the low E just a tad more still. Handy hint coming up - if you have a "friend" who insists on cutting the low E string slot too low because he wants the action as low as possible - it is useful to know that the slot can be filled and recut - you just tap in a bit of baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) to the base of the slot, and carefully apply a drop or 2 of super-glue to soak into the powder. After a few minutes it sets to a rock-hard consistency and can be re-filed. As recommended by the great guitar tech/repair man Dan Erlewine. Ahmm, well that's what I told my "friend" to do anyway...

    So the guitar is now set up with new bone bits, and a new set of 13-56 80:20 bronze strings, and a pretty low action to boot. I have tightened the truss rod a little to keep things with just a slight neck relief, and to me it is sounding pretty good. I think I'm going to be OK with the heavier strings, and at the moment, I am liking the tone. So I guess that's about it for the acoustic upgrading, still into DADGAD tuning, so will have to learn some DADGAD stuff to play on it now. \:\)


  • JockoJocko Posts: 6,870Member, Moderator
    Nice job Graham. Looks like you could take a little off the nut before you next change the string. 5 and 6 look okay but 1 to 3 look a little deep. May just be to photo though.
  • Pete_BPete_B Posts: 28Member
     Originally Posted By: Megi
    still into DADGAD tuning, so will have to learn some DADGAD stuff to play on it now. \:\)


    Kashmir by Led Zep springs to mind
  • AlidoreAlidore Posts: 527Member
     Originally Posted By: Megi
    still into DADGAD tuning, so will have to learn some DADGAD stuff to play on it now. \:\)


    Kashmir by Led Zep springs to mind
    Pete.

    “There are 10 kinds of people in the world: those who understand binary, and those who don't.”
  • MegiMegi Posts: 6,748Member
     Originally Posted By: Jocko
    Nice job Graham. Looks like you could take a little off the nut before you next change the string. 5 and 6 look okay but 1 to 3 look a little deep. May just be to photo though.
    No, you are correct, 1 to 3 are a little on the deep side - mainly a result of the strings being so much thinner than the wopping 56 on the the bass side. So probably a bit of pairing down to do on the treble side, a job for another day. Although it may be more of a cosmetic improvement than anything - I think I've managed to cut the slots well and to the right dimensions, and I'm having no issues with strings sticking in the slots or anything. Just had the guitar up to standard tuning, and it really does make a great "strummer" with the 13s on, sounding great to me.

    Alidore - Kashmir! yes why not, cheers for the idea. \:\)
  • JockoJocko Posts: 6,870Member, Moderator
    How I reduce the height of a nut is just before a string change I file the nut right down to the strings. I then remove the strings and by the time I dress and fine polish the top of the nut, it is down to the right height. Just my way of doing it.
  • MegiMegi Posts: 6,748Member
     Originally Posted By: Jocko
    How I reduce the height of a nut is just before a string change I file the nut right down to the strings. I then remove the strings and by the time I dress and fine polish the top of the nut, it is down to the right height. Just my way of doing it.
    Sounds like a good approach to me, I'll give that a go when it next comes to string-changing time, cheers for the tip J!
  • Ape09090Ape09090 Posts: 2,744Member
    I have a Sigma brand acoustic here that I had given up hope on as there's a clear line on the headstock and the back of the neck that shows where those two pieces of wood were joined together,I'm guessing that's a sign that the joint is about to fail so I've left the guitar without strings for a while.
    I did put a set of strings on it recently though,10's to 56' I think and I had a look at the set up on the guitar.
    The neck/headstock is holding together so far but there's a pretty high action on her and if I lower the action using the truss rod then I get buzzing on the first two or three frets for the high E and B strings.

    Anyway,I was just getting ready to accept that the guitar may need a fret polish just under where the buzzing was when this thread started up and now I've taken the bridge saddle out and given it an introduction to a piece of sandpaper so thanks for reminding me of the possibility of doing that which I had clean forgotten about.
    I shall factor that in as I go about salvaging the guitar,the small amount I've taken off so far appears to have contributed something positive to how the guitar feels in the hands now anyway.
    \:\)
  • JockoJocko Posts: 6,870Member, Moderator
    However much you wish to lower the action by, at the 12th fret, you need to take twice that amount out of the bridge. If you want to lower the action by 0.020" you have to lower the bridge by 0.040". I often find there is not enough meat in the bridge saddle to make the reduction necessary.
  • Ape09090Ape09090 Posts: 2,744Member
    I'm just going in very small increments,I'll settle somewhere I'm happy sooner or later hopefully without having to repeat the exercise.
    \:\)
  • MegiMegi Posts: 6,748Member
    I find the same thing with adjusting the action on an acoustic - you only know what too low is when you've gone too low! in which case it's going to need a new saddle and start again lol. I may take another mil off the saddle on mine at the next string change, so half a mil at the 12th fret - and I think that will be a plenty low enough action for an acoustic. Hope you can get your Sigma sorted Ape - it may be structurally sound at the heel joint, despite appearences.
  • Ape09090Ape09090 Posts: 2,744Member
    It's hard not to be concerned when you can see the joint through the finish,in a way I was hoping it would fail and I could have a chance to repair it myself and then at least I would know it had been repaired but I guess it may be stronger than it appears.
    I would think putting 10 gauge strings on will have alleviated a fair bit of the tension on that joint if the previous set's of strings were a higher gauge too.



    I just loosened the truss rod by a quarter turn so I'll let her sit for an hour now and see if that's affected anything later on.
    \:\)
  • MegiMegi Posts: 6,748Member
    I see what you mean Andrew - that does not look good at all. I was thinking maybe the finish is just sinking into the joint a bit leaving a visible line, but that looks like the 2 halves are parting company! I'm not a repair person, but I wonder if it would be feasible to get some strong glue (epoxy?) in there and then clamp it.
  • LesterLester Posts: 1,504Member, Moderator
    I too have that icky feeling. I suspect that a managed break would be required in order to do a quality repair. A difficult decision; I feel for you.
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